BestWork Blog

Millennials Must Understand Their Why

The primary concern for many leaders is how to develop the next generation of leadership. It’s a challenging task for leaders who are managing Millennials. In a recent post, we highlighted the number one lesson from the White House Economic Advisory Council Study on Millennials: investing in developing Millennials will pay big dividends. However, it’s not always clear how to do so.

To help business leaders overcome the challenge of developing Millennial leaders, we suggest that a shift in perspective is required from the typical approach to management. The typical approach to management is to focus on how employees perform their duties. To succeed when managing and leading Millennials – and to help them transition into leadership roles themselves – you must help them understand more than how, you must give them the opportunity to understand their why.

To succeed when managing and leading Millennials you must help them understand more than how, you must give them the opportunity to understand their why. Click To Tweet

Mercer has pointed out that Millennials lead the trend in the workplace of people who are “happy but leaving,” or considering working somewhere else. This is the unique challenge that leadership faces when managing Millennials, and helping them understand why will help your emerging leaders be “happy and staying.”

As a leader we must trust that we’ve made good hiring decisions and our employees are capable of determining how something must be done. This is especially the case for Millennials who are highly educated and have diverse backgrounds. With a clear description of the objective or task, they’re bound to deliver. To keep emerging leaders on track, advancing corporate goals while developing their own capabilities, is another matter. That’s where the why becomes much more important than how.

This is more than harnessing the “passion” of the Millennials on your team. The crux of the matter is connecting their drive to corporate goals and objectives, providing a clear sense of how their internal passions align with the external mission of your organization.

Here are 3 steps to help your Millennials understand their why:

    1. Millennials must build greater self-awareness and EQ. They’ve got to know themselves and how they relate to others, before they can connect their attributes to corporate goals. You can accomplish through data-driven assessments. At BestWork, Inc. we prefer a proven approach which reviews life stories as a means of discovering hidden talents and passions – determining relevant strengths for their role.
    2. Your organization has got to know its mission. For your Millennials to align their strengths and interests to your goals, you’ve got to make it clear what your goals are, and the mission of your company. Plus, you need to express this in corporate communications and the actions of the organization.
    3. Provide opportunities for Millennials to connect their strengths to your corporate goals. This doesn’t mean that you hand over the reins immediately. In fact, coaching and feedback are more valuable than raises and promotions. Providing opportunities for advancement aligned with interests, and providing the support for Millennials to get there, is what wins the day in the end.

    This last point can’t be underscored enough. The most successful organizations take their orders from the front lines. It helps to remember that Millennials are the best educated generation to enter the workforce yet. They know how to get things done very effectively.

    Millennials are the best educated generation to enter the workforce yet. Click To Tweet

  1. It’s your job as a leader to allow your Millennials to understand their why in the context of your organization. This will improve retention and provide a natural progression through leadership development that carries your organization into the future – on the backs of people who are committed to carrying the load and share in your vision.

 

Managing Millennials 3-Day Mini Course

Spencer Deering coaches Millennials and managers of Millennials on how to do their BestWork.

$149 USD

Features:

  • 12 Lessons on Managing Millennials
  • Practical Advice You Can Use Right Away
  • Tips on what to do: Daily, Weekly, Monthly, Quarterly

Based on the latest research combined with over 30 years of proven management principles, this course will teach you to be a better manager of Millennials and any individual – from any generation.

Upon completion of the course, you’ll receive a certificate plus a badge you can use in your email signature and on LinkedIn showing that you’ve mastered the art of Managing Millennials. You’ll also receive a bonus, a FREE copy of the How to Be a Millennial Whisperer eBook.

Share with a Friend

Call for Coaching

1(800) 333-9003

Read the Latest Posts

Top 5 Challenges Managing Millennials

In one of our previous articles we listed the most common challenges faced by Millennials. In this article we’ll look at the “other side of the equation” revealing the top 5 challenges faced whenmanaging Millennials in the workforce. Millennials became the largest generation in the U.S. labor force in 2016 according to a Pew Research […]

Motivating Millennials at Work – Moving Beyond Biscotti and Bonuses

The problems faced by Millennials are real, and it is leaders’ responsibility to make sure the Millennial generation who will be making up 75 percent of the workforce by 2025, feels more motivated and engaged then ever. When it comes to motivating Millennials at work, the typical approaches of bonus structures and employee perks don’t […]

Millennial Work-Life Balance – Shifting Perspectives and Changing Norms

Millennial work-life balance is much different than previous generations. When we look at the challenges Millennials face as they enter parenthood and take on increasing responsibilities in the workforce, is no surprise that Millennials are taking a different approach to work-life balance. A global study by EY titled Work-life challenges across generations reveals the differences […]